Life after the Great Hatch: Simplifying Access with Lumina

At the Great Hatch 2018, we saw the formation of several life-saving innovations in just 24 hours. For many of these passionate inventors, that weekend was just the beginning. Over the next few weeks, we will be featuring three of the groups that have continued to work on their projects.

This week we caught up with Jessica from Lumina, winner of the Hatching Health Grand Prize.

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How was your experience at the event last year?

We had a great time! None of us knew each other prior to The Great Hatch, but we grew a lot as a team and met a lot of awesome people interested in similar fields.

Tell us a bit about your project. How did your group come up with the problem and your objectives?

Our problem was pitched by Dr. David Agulnik, who is an ER physician at St. Paul’s. Many procedures in the ER require central venous access, a process through which catheters are inserted into blood vessels. The current process is more than 60 years old and riddled with inefficiencies, and we wanted to find a simple solution to reduce the amount of time and risk of error in the operation.

We decided that we wanted something that requires the least amount of adjustment for physicians, and something that could be set into motion quickly, which is why we opted for mechanical improvements over creating a new procedure.

What do you find meaningful about your project and its goals?

We were all drawn to the idea of quick changes that could make a significant difference in healthcare without taking many years to test, approve, and implement.

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What role did The Great Hatch have in developing your project?

Apart from bringing our team together and giving us a space to explore our objectives, the Great Hatch allowed us to make our first prototypes with the 3D printers, and allowed us to consult with key stakeholders such as other physicians, medical residents, and companies like Kardium.

What is the status of your project now and what do you see for the future?

Since The Great Hatch, we have been hard at work to improve our design and acquire funding for a provisional patent. In terms of our product, we have streamlined our CAD model, added ergonomic features based on user feedback, and printed a higher quality prototype from a 3D printing company.

In terms of funding, we have participated in the MDDC Biomedical Engineering Design Awards and won the Innovation Prize for $2500. We are currently in the final rounds for the Joule Innovation grant and we are looking for more grant opportunities. Patent lawyers are not cheap!

Is there any advice you would like to share with future participants?

The best piece of advice we can share to future participants is to find a problem that is really worth solving and to stay open-minded throughout the entire event.


Life after the Great Hatch: Seeing Clearly with VitalEyes

At the Great Hatch 2018, we saw the formation of several life-saving innovations in just 24 hours. For many of these passionate inventors, that weekend was just the beginning. Over the next few weeks, we will be featuring three of the groups that have continued to work on their projects.

This week we caught up with David and Chris from VitalEyes, winner of the Faculty of Applied Science Innovation Award.

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How was your experience at the event last year?

The Great Hatch was exactly what I was looking for as a health professional with several health-related ideas but with no understanding of how proceed to make them a reality. It’s a fantastic environment to engage and brainstorm with students/graduates from many disciplines who together can help get a project started with amazing results. I feel extremely fortunate to have been involved in this event and I am very pleased to continue my association with the groups I collaborated with.

Tell us a bit about your project. How did your group come up with the problem and your objectives?

VitalEyes is a non-contact vital sign monitoring solution that detects and alerts health care professionals when patients are detected to have potentially serious abnormal vital signs while sitting in emergency waiting rooms. The original concept was to coordinate multiple modalities such as cameras and thermometers through computer vision to accurately monitor patients' vitals. Our vision was to identify and detect visual and vital sign cues of healthcare emergencies in order to make lifesaving, timely interventions.

What do you find meaningful about your project and its goals?

Having the opportunity to hack together a ‘futuristic’ solution that has the potential to save lives kept our team working through the night. Accurate non-contact vitals monitoring has the potential to disrupt healthcare beyond the walls of emergency waiting rooms, providing the infrastructure for further innovation and research. This excites us, which is why our team has continued working on VitalEyes after The Great Hatch.

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What role did The Great Hatch have in developing your project?

The Great Hatch helped bring together our team of engineers, designers and healthcare professionals. The event incubated an encouraging atmosphere of creative collaboration through inspiring speakers, resourceful mentors, GREAT FOOD, and the contagious enthusiasm shared by the participants, mentors, and organizers.

What is the status of your project now and what do you see for the future?

Our engineering team is currently looking into the use of radio waves for non-contact vitals monitoring. The use of radio waves to accurately monitor heart rate and respiratory rate is well researched and promising for our setting. In the future, we see this new technology integrate and augment our original vision. We are now waiting to see if some additional grant money will come through and are looking into recruiting additional personnel with expertise in the area. 

Is there any advice you would like to share with future participants?

The Great Hatch (or any other hackathon) is the perfect opportunity to try an ambitious project or jump into a totally new field. There’s something about working with other brilliant team members, the caffeine, the energy of the building - that accumulates into a rewarding surprise.


Hatching Health 2018 Impact

The Great Hatch 2018 brought together passionate innovators from as far away as Edmonton and the results were amazingly creative solutions to tough healthcare problems. We’re thrilled with the growth teams have experienced since the event finished in March. The winners of our four awards were:

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The Hatching Health Grand Prize 2018 for best overall solution went to Lumina, a team that created simple, low-cost mechanical improvements on tools used in central venous access to improve efficiency and reduce risk. They thought of an eloquent and practical solution that can have a serious positive impact on patient outcomes. Our judges were especially impressed with the prototype they had prepared using 3D printing.

 

The Faculty of Medicine Catalyst Award for best interdisciplinary collaboration went to Flutter, who developed a personalized fetal monitoring system that also provides education and counselling to first-time mothers.

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The Joule Healthcare Innovation Award for biggest potential healthcare impact went to DTech, an easy to use at home diagnostic device designed to help diabetics manage their foot health.

 

The Faculty of Applied Science Award for the most technical innovation went to one of our finalists, VitalEyes. They created a way to non-invasively monitor vitals through computer vision.

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2017 WINNERS

The PHIX Grand Prize - UriKnow and BeLeaf

UBC Faculty of Medicine Catalyst Award - OpioidCrisis

GenomeBC Innovation Award - MommyHealth

UBC Faculty of Applied Science Innovation Award - LocoMobility

2016 WINNERS

The Geyer Family First Place Award - Smart Curve

VCHRI Second Place Award - UpRight

UBC Biomedical Engineering Hardware Award - Companion

HumanAPI Software Award - Happi

Doctors of BC Collaboration Award - StrollSight